Video 30 Aug 291,151 notes

alreadygonewilde:

baku-babe:

vvidget:

CHOCOLATE FOOD PORN

image

uuuuuuuuugggggggggghhhhhhh

Photo 30 Aug 9,905 notes faramireowyn:

Typical Thorin

faramireowyn:

Typical Thorin

Photo 3 May 33,243 notes memeguy-com:

and that was the last time I wore a puffy vest to the bars
hasn’t happened to me yet!

memeguy-com:

and that was the last time I wore a puffy vest to the bars

hasn’t happened to me yet!

Text 26 Apr

So I don’t know about you, but I am pretty damn happy about my life right now. 

Video 3 Mar 242,328 notes

rihenna:

Ellen on how the Oscars are like the Hunger Games

Photo 3 Mar 2,740 notes 
0013/1000 photos of jennifer lawrence

daaaamn

0013/1000 photos of jennifer lawrence

daaaamn

Photo 3 Mar 149,197 notes thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

via AFTERWARDS.
Video 2 Mar 1,619,538 notes

zizicat:

I just wanted a gifset of all three… (x,x,x)

Video 1 Mar 747,126 notes

(Source: iraffiruse)

Text 28 Feb 1,166 notes "We thought Thurman ova there havin’ a seizure, turns out he just excited about nature."

so I just found Ghetto Hikes, and I don’t think it’s racist at all. Quite hilarious, actually. 

Video 25 Feb 3,191 notes

areyousuretonightsadangernight:

The Silmarillion in 3 Minutes

I stumbled upon this video today and it is brilliant. A high level overview, but a great jumping off point for anyone who has put off starting the Silmarillion because they’re feeling overwhelmed by all that crazy history

Video 25 Feb 489,191 notes

e-zekiel:

cute story: I have a friend with a prosthetic arm, and he once confided in me that, after seeing this movie, he’s always wanted someone to ask him for this. Then, the one day, I was at the grocery store with him and a couple other people, and one of our friends couldn’t reach a box on the shelf and asked him, “Dude gimme a hand here”. And, I swear to christ he practiced this because the speed at which he slipped off his prosthesis was blinding, and then he hurled his arm at her. He, unfortunately, got a tad overexcited, and instead of it just landing near her, it spun out and essentially bitchslapped her in mid-air.
Now we say it all the time around him, and he blames Disney for the fact that he has no girlfriend.

(Source: heathledgers)

Photo 25 Feb 25,491 notes
Photo 25 Feb 95,064 notes danaorherdouble:

davidhorvitz:

The Distance of a Day. A video of a sunset in Los Angeles made by my mother with her iPhone next to a video of a sunrise in the Maldives made by me. They were recorded simultaneously. At the exact same moment the sun was setting in Los Angeles it was rising in the Maldives. We were watching the sun together, thousands of miles apart.

#people of older generations like to complain that technology pushes people apart#I have only this to say: you must be using it wrong (x)

this is fucking beautiful. i expect to see this again around mother’s day. 

danaorherdouble:

davidhorvitz:

The Distance of a Day. A video of a sunset in Los Angeles made by my mother with her iPhone next to a video of a sunrise in the Maldives made by me. They were recorded simultaneously. At the exact same moment the sun was setting in Los Angeles it was rising in the Maldives. We were watching the sun together, thousands of miles apart.

 (x)

this is fucking beautiful. i expect to see this again around mother’s day. 

(Source: silverbelltree)

Text 25 Feb 37,336 notes

gaymeme:

officialdecepticon:

i always wanted to know, how do straight ppl have sex?????????????????????????????????

very quietly at 9pm twice a week

this guy ^^^^^^

(Source: transuzusanageyama)

via AFTERWARDS.

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